AMI serves a variety of public and private sector clients through projects designed to advance community, business and economic development. The company’s work in this area covers a range of activities that includes trade facilitation, feasibility analyses, developing export and investment development strategies, assessing impacts of policies and regulations governing industrial development, strengthening the capabilities of trade and investment agencies.

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United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Washington


2020

AMI is a subcontractor to The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Innovation Design Services (IDS) Contract. The IDS mechanism offers flexibility and support to USAID Missions, Bureaus, and Independent Offices (MBIOs) seeking to apply innovation to the design process for greater development impact.

Managed by the U.S. Global Development Lab’s Innovation Design and Advisory (iDesign) team, IDS offers customized technical assistance from a diverse network of specialized organizations and consultants.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) India


2019

In recent years, our partnership with India has transformed dramatically.  India has risen to become both a leading global power as well as an important partner of the United States.  The USAID-India relationship has shifted from a traditional donor- recipient relationship to a peer-to peer partnership for addressing Indian and global challenges. Through this partnership, USAID started to work together in a triangular mode of cooperation to transfer effective agricultural innovations to other developing countries. The U.S. Governments’ global hunger and food security initiative Feed the Future, is a major initiative in this direction.  This triangular training program is part of this initiative.

AMI evaluated this training program that aims to impart knowledge and skills to agricultural professionals from the select countries in Africa and Asia, about the technologies and approaches that helped India to deal with its food security challenges. AMI analyzed and held focus groups for back-at-work plans, beneficiaries and government officials.

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET 7)


2019 – 2024

AMI is a subcontractor to The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) to provide services in support of the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET 7 ) for USAID’s Office of Food for Peace in the Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance Bureau (USAID/DCHA/FFP). This IDIQ is for the implementation of the FEWSNET 7 Emergency Food Insecurity Analysis, Analysis of the Dynamics of Food, Nutrition and Livelihood Security, and Technology and Innovation. FEWS NET 7 continues to serve the same basic goal for which the project was founded: sustainably prevent food insecurity and famine. While the likelihood of large-scale drought induced famines which led to the creation of FEWS is lower today than in the past, nearly a billion people still suffer from hunger and under nutrition. The risk of famine has not been completely eliminated, as shown by the famine in Somalia in 2010/2011. At the same time, the number and complexity of the challenges to food security are increasing. Most recent food crises have had multiple, overlapping root causes, with climate change, resource scarcity or misallocation, poor governance, conflict, disease, and price or macroeconomic shocks playing a role, in addition to drought or other extreme weather events. Within the broader goal, and recognizing the challenges which still exist, the FEWS NET 7 activity will achieve the following objectives: ● Deliver early warning on the location, cause(s) and magnitude of current and future food insecurity to the U.S. Government and partners; ● Improve the quality and timeliness of information and analysis useful for achieving sustainable food security; and ● Strengthen sustainable and innovative local, national, regional and international capabilities to understand and appropriately address current, recurrent and chronic food insecurity.

United States Department of Labor - Human Resources


2015 – 2019

AMI provides a full range of pay, premium pay, and leave administration laws, regulations, principles, and practices sufficient to serve as a consultant in providing advice and guidance to managers and employees; advise management, employees, and union officials on work scheduling and hours of work requirements and flexibilities (including alternative work schedules) and premium pay entitlements associated with various work scheduling scenarios (e.g., overtime, night or Sunday pay); estimate the payroll costs that may be incurred from various work scheduling options; provide advice on employee grievances and claims involving pay and leave entitlements; analyze regulations to develop operating procedures or processes for an organization’s alternative work schedule; leave bank and leave sharing; and/or recruitment, relocation, and retention incentive programs. AMI provides the full range of pay administration policies, principles, and practices under title 5, United States Code, and other statutes and legal authorities as applicable sufficient to interpret and apply laws, regulations, policies, and practices to provide advice and guidance to officials, supervisors, and employees; advise on setting and adjusting pay for new and continuing employees, implementing pay schedule adjustments (may include General Schedule, Federal Wage System, locality pay and/or other geographic pay), special salary rates, pay limitations, allowances, differentials, hours of duty, work schedule (including alternative work schedules), premium pay, Fair Labor Standards Act overtime pay, grade and pay retention, severance pay, recruitment and retention flexibilities, back pay and settlement of claims, and application of single agency compensation authorities where applicable; and provide advice to management relative to compliance with the law, achieve correct compensation results, avoid unnecessary costs, settle claims against the Government, and foster an understanding of statutory compensation entitlements, regulations, labor contracts (as applicable), court decisions, and Comptroller General opinions.

AMI analyzes, interprets, develops, and implements laws, regulations, policies, and guidance involving subject matter areas within compensation administration (e.g., pay and/or leave administration, WebTA, awards, reporting, etc.) and advising management on the use of compensation flexibilities to help recruit, manage, and retain employees. In depth knowledge and experience working with and in the National Finance Center’s (NFC) pay system and the HR Connect system.
AMI work involves developing, delivering, managing, and maintaining HR information systems when the paramount knowledge requirement is human resources management, rather than information technology.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Dominican Republic


2017 – 2018

AMI completed a mid-term performance evaluation of USAID/Caribbean Regional Development Program’s Caribbean Marine Biodiversity Program (CMBP) and provided USAID, its implementing partner, and other stakeholders with robust and independent findings, conclusions, and recommendations regarding CMBP performance since its inception. USAID and its implementing partner used the findings, conclusions, and recommendations generated by this evaluation, as appropriate, to make any needed mid- course adjustments for the remaining life of the activity, highlight successes to date, and bring to bear evidence for design and implementation of similar and/or future regional marine biodiversity conservation activities in the Caribbean and other regions. USAID also used the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of the mid-term evaluation to the design of a final evaluation of CMBP.

The audiences for the final report of the mid-term evaluation were:

  • USAID missions involved in managing CMBP (i.e., Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Haiti, and Eastern and

Southern Caribbean)

  • USAID/Washington bureaus and offices, including the Bureau for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) and the Forestry and Biodiversity (FAB) Office in the Bureau for Economic Growth, Education, and Environment (E3)
  • Implementing partner (The Nature Conservancy)
  • Other stakeholders (e.g., national and regional government ministries and offices)

AMI, in consultation with its implementing partner, USAID has decided to focus this mid-term performance evaluation on two of the activity’s Expected Results: Expected Result 3: “Sustainable Fisheries and Sustainable Livelihoods for Fishers,” and Expected Result 4, “Effective management and governance of Marine Protected Areas and/or Marine Managed Areas (MPA/MMAs).

The Caribbean Marine Biodiversity Program promotes the “America First” philosophy of the Administration by promoting the security, safety and economic interests of the USG as well as core American identity values. It is important that our neighboring countries have strong economies and employment opportunities. By protecting and conserving marine and coastal resources and strengthening the management of marine protected areas USAID is also promoting sustainable fishing practices. A thriving and sustainable fishing sector will allow for increased economic opportunities for coastal community members and reduce illegal immigration to the United States.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Africa


GSA MOBIS contract # GS-10F0104R, Task Order No. AID-OAA-M-13-00012
Subcontract Estimated Completion Date: 2015 – 2018

The Africa Bureau Office of Sustainable Development – Management Support and Technical Analysis Services Contract is designed to assist the USAID Africa Bureau’s Office of Sustainable Development (AFR/SD) to achieve its strategic goals:

Support USAID economic growth and trade related activities in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), including AFRlSD’s role serving as the Secretariat for the USAID Trade Hub Management Council,

Provide logistical and administrative support for the planning, knowledge management, communications, and outreach for all technical divisions of AFRlSD, and

Provide technical services to AFR/SD and all its technical divisions in formulating a new, robust, cross-cutting and inclusive strategy in content areas including but not limited to health; education; conflict; peace building; governance; economic growth; agriculture and trade via a multi-sectoral approach to achieving development goals, deepening understanding of development trends, and improving program performance while integrating gender and environmental considerations and requirements.

Alter Modus International Corporation (AMI Corp) plays a significant role in the provision of technical advice and training services under the Project in, but not limited to, the following areas: knowledge management support, development and assessment of strategic initiatives and projects in the trade and investment and other relevant areas, support as needed on logistics and program details for conferences and workshops, and monitoring and evaluation support.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Angola


2018

AMI provided the services of a retreat facilitator who assisted the Mission in fostering greater leadership and organizational resilience with the aim of promoting unity, camaraderie and a disciplined focus towards overcoming challenges and attaining Mission development objectives. The facilitator worked with the Mission to address issues related to communication and teamwork within individual teams and across the Mission. Objectives:
• Increase staff effectiveness through shared understanding of interpersonal and team dynamics;
• Strengthen leadership behaviors, skills and approaches of all staff ; Support continuous Mission-wide strategic planning, communications and operational improvement efforts; and
• Boost staff morale and cohesion through informal, off-site interaction.
Deliverables included: Retreat Planning; Design a pre-retreat survey instrument and conduct a survey to identify themes and potential issues to be addressed at the retreat
Design and conduct pre-retreat information gathering efforts through one-on-one interviews with selected staff or on-line survey instruments that allow anonymous responses.
Develop a detailed retreat agenda with stated goal and objectives. This includes a timeline and suggestions for the format of the retreat.
The facilitators consulted with USAID/Liberia leadership prior to final approval of the agenda and schedule of activities.
The Mission established a retreat working group to provide assistance in preparing for and organizing the retreat. The working group was able to assist during the retreat as needed.
Deliverable Number 2: Retreat Facilitation
Create and administer various interactive and fun outdoor activities that will help facilitate the interaction needed to move the group successfully to achieving the goal and objectives.
Clearly state the objectives of each session both at the beginning and end of the sessions.
Map out ideas and action items from the activities.
Develop a collective action plan that identifies major achievable actions and changes that will be tracked by the Mission Program office during the year following the retreat.
Closing thoughts and accomplishments should be presented to the participants at the end of the retreat. Facilitator was able to listen to the discussions and tone of the retreat and be flexible to modify activities and discussions as appropriate.
A post retreat presentation to all staff summarizing the retreat and identifying expected next steps for the Mission.
A detailed report providing a record of retreat proceedings, evaluation results.

United States Department of Labor - Information Technology


2018 – Ongoing

AMI is responsible for Designing, coding, testing, documenting, and deploying global applications based on system and user requirements. Creates design specifications for high availability and highly scalable applications which will be used by both internal and external customers. Works with clients and Business Analysts to determine software requirements and system impacts. Generates technical documentation as well as unit and functional tests. Initiates major changes in architecture and software development techniques/processes. Analyzing business requirements, processes, data, and system integration points to determine/recommend appropriate technology solutions. SharePoint management and development experience (Workflows, Web Parts, Apps, Visual Studio). Frontend/backend web development experience (HTML5, JavaScript, CSS, JQuery, Bootstrap, ASP.NET, CFML, C#, REST). Database and SQL experience (MS SQL Server, MYSQL, Oracle). Secure software development basic principals. Expert knowledge in analyzing, designing, and developing solutions to highly complex problems. Familiar with Unit Test, Mock, Test Driven Development, continuous integration, etc. Requirement Development, Design Development, Coding. Peer Reviews and Analysis. Requirements Based Testing. Technical Problem resolution & Troubleshooting. Provides effective technical documentation.

Technologies Platform Used: Microsoft SharePoint 2016 – Enterprise; Microsoft SharePoint Online – Enterprise; Lawson; ColdFusion; Microsoft .Net Framework (2.0 – 4.5) ; Microsoft C#; Microsoft SQL Server 2005 – 2012; Object Oriented Development including OO design patterns; Microsoft InfoPath Custom Development; SharePoint 2007 – 2013 Object Model; Master Pages and Page Layouts; Cascading Style sheets; Taxonomy Design; Content Types and Metadata Design; Custom Web Parts, Field Controls, Site Definitions, Event Handlers, MOSS Application Pages; Windows Workflow Foundation Workflows including multiple states workflows; HTML5 | jQuery | JavaScript | XML / XSLT.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Liberia


2017

AMI provided the services of a retreat facilitator who assisted the Mission in fostering greater leadership and organizational resilience with the aim of promoting unity, camaraderie and a disciplined focus towards overcoming challenges and attaining Mission development objectives. The facilitator worked with the Mission to address issues related to communication and teamwork within individual teams and across the Mission. Objectives:
• Increase staff effectiveness through shared understanding of interpersonal and team dynamics;
• Strengthen leadership behaviors, skills and approaches of all staff ; Support continuous Mission-wide strategic planning, communications and operational improvement efforts; and
• Boost staff morale and cohesion through informal, off-site interaction.
Deliverables included: Retreat Planning; Design a pre-retreat survey instrument and conduct a survey to identify themes and potential issues to be addressed at the retreat
Design and conduct pre-retreat information gathering efforts through one-on-one interviews with selected staff or on-line survey instruments that allow anonymous responses.
Develop a detailed retreat agenda with stated goal and objectives. This includes a timeline and suggestions for the format of the retreat.
The facilitators consulted with USAID/Liberia leadership prior to final approval of the agenda and schedule of activities.
The Mission established a retreat working group to provide assistance in preparing for and organizing the retreat. The working group was able to assist during the retreat as needed.
Deliverable Number 2: Retreat Facilitation
Create and administer various interactive and fun outdoor activities that will help facilitate the interaction needed to move the group successfully to achieving the goal and objectives.
Clearly state the objectives of each session both at the beginning and end of the sessions.
Map out ideas and action items from the activities.
Develop a collective action plan that identifies major achievable actions and changes that will be tracked by the Mission Program office during the year following the retreat.
Closing thoughts and accomplishments should be presented to the participants at the end of the retreat. Facilitator was able to listen to the discussions and tone of the retreat and be flexible to modify activities and discussions as appropriate.
A post retreat presentation to all staff summarizing the retreat and identifying expected next steps for the Mission.
A detailed report providing a record of retreat proceedings, evaluation results.

United States Department of Labor - Policy


2016 – 2019

AMI supports The Office of Management and Policy (OMAP) and provides overall planning, direction and management of all administrative responsibilities of the OIG. This includes independently providing the full range of budget, human resources, information technology, procurement, and logistics services to the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) nationwide.

AMI provides qualified contract support to address the following areas:

• Budget Analysis
• Management Analysis
• Performance Analytics and Dashboarding
• Workforce Analytics and Projections
• Policy Analysis and Development
• Accounting, federal budget procedures, and electronic financial tracking systems.
• Business Objects and SQL Server Report Services Business Intelligence Data Tool Set
• Crystal Reports 2013

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Washington


2016

AMI conducted a diaspora study for the USAID/Washington Bureau for Africa. The study sought to better understand the capacity and interest of the African diaspora to engage in and impact the current and future development agenda of sub-Saharan Africa through trade, investment, mentorship and knowledge transfer, advocacy, and volunteerism. The study qualified existing databases and identified additional African diaspora organizations, leaders, and other implementing vehicles and organizations that are deemed to be of interest to the diaspora and through which the diaspora could participate in the economic growth and development of sub-Saharan Africa. The results of this study informed the design and development of a diaspora strategy and consequently activities to engage the African diaspora community in supporting their demonstrated investment and development interests.
The data collected through an online survey that focused on understanding the African diaspora areas of focus, needs, and how those intersect with the work in AFR was completed and used for a final report. Using the study data, the AFR bureau was able to better understand under which conditions African diaspora would engage with USAID and other USG agencies in sub-Saharan Africa’s development future and what instrument(s) would be most effective in engaging the African diaspora.

General Services Administration (GSA)


2015 – 2016

AMI was awarded this Prime contract to work on the evaluation and discovery of the Office of Government Wide Policy  (OGP’s) data collections, data storage, and domains/sites. AMI determines the level of maturity, process of data collections, and details regarding data storage of all OGP domain/websites by coordinating interviews (in person and virtual), reviewing existing documentation, and other methods. After which, AMI documents all findings, creates process maps, and make recommendations for consolidation of the OGP systems.
AMI supports the Office of Management and Budget OMB directives have called upon agencies to use data, evidence, and analysis to inform management and policy decisions.
• FY 12, M-12-14 called the greater use of “evidence and evaluation to drive operations and policy-making, emphasizing the need to use “evidence and rigorous evaluation in budget, management and policy decisions to make government work effectively.”
• FY13, OMB memorandum, “Next Steps in the Evidence and Innovation Agenda (M-13-17), outlined a vision or advancing evidence-based policymaking by “increasing access to administrative data…and strengthening agencies’ capacity to build and use evidence.”
• FY12, M-12-12,”Promotinve Efficient Spending to support Agency Operations,” called for specific review of fleet, travel, and real property operations to operations to assure the government is promoting efficient spending in the support of agency operations.

General Services Administration (GSA)


2015 – 2016

AMI expert team of professionals with applied experience in the data validation and audit services worked closely with the designated COR and conduct all their tasks. Given our standard business systems and business intelligence experts knowledge and applied experience, we:
– Conducted a quick, yet a detailed inventory of all the organizations and associated reporting systems in each of the organizations required to report to the FRPP and GSA system on an annual basis. This inventory of all these systems enabled AMI Subject Matter Experts to have a clear and comprehensive picture and account of all the organization required to report to the FRPP system, and each of their reporting systems;

– Identified the data elements, data dictionary, amount of existing data already stored in each of the systems. This approach will enable AMI SMEs to build a solid data management baseline by identifying which organizations are required to report to FRPP and the GSA, how much data needs to be reported every reporting period, what particular data needs to be reported, and what data formats and types need to be reported;

– Conducted an in-depth data quality review of all the existing data collected for data validity, consistency, completeness and compliance with existing operating procedures in place;
– Performed a thorough evaluation of the existing operational guidelines with regards to the data management practices in each of the organization reporting, systems operating and staff performing these tasks;

After performing all the above preliminary tasks in the project, our subject matter experts dug into the each of the data batches received to-date and evaluate each data batch qualitatively and quantitatively. This undertaking guaranteed that our experts study every bit of data from a performance management stand point where qualitative data and or quantitative data exist. Our data quality expert SME used cutting-edge performance management, data analytics techniques and methods to ensure that performance quality data meets all the required assumptions for quality, completeness, validity, consistency and accuracy.

– Our Subject Matter Experts held one-on-one meetings and brainstorming sessions with the COR at the GSA and the assigned FRPP data recipients to identify the types of decision making products needed, who is looking for what data, and what particular uses of the collected data are expected by each of the entities in the community of interest;

Our subject matter experts studied all the grounds for data management from the data reporting and data user stand point. Following these set of steps will guarantee that our Subject Matter Experts have all the required pieces of the puzzle together in order to establish a comprehensive bigger picture of the view of all aspects of the project. We looked at the necessary analysis of the datasets and data integration between financial and the FRPP datasets. AMI subject matter experts conducted a number of different data analysis and system analysis as a pilot initiative to test the waters to:

– Identify common denominators of each data set including financial datasets, FRPP datasets and any other inventory and property datasets. This particular method enabled AMI subject matter experts to figure out accurate steps, mechanisms and possibilities of data integration procedures at small to large scales depending on the amount of data being considered at this stage. Our initial studies of the data types came in handy at this very stage where we will build technical and data linkages between financial datasets and the FRPP datasets to ensure accurate and sustainable data integration occurs. This method of data integration practices will guarantee high quality and comprehensive datasets which will include not only FRPP, but also financial datasets and other datasets identified later in the project.

AMI’s accurate undertaking of this particular project lead into instituting accurate, manageable and implementable standard operating procedures as the go-to document for conducting accountability and data validation for the GSA and FRPP.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


2015 – 2016

AMI Supports HHS Office of Global Affairs (OGA) overall and the subordinate Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Unit requires management, logistics, and administrative support for events and meetings in supports of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). AMI manages and provides planning and logistical support for multiple events/meeting of various sizes. AMI provides the following services/activities: Identifies, negotiates, and coordinates suitable venues for events and meetings even if government meeting facilities are used; Acquires specific technical services and resources such as communication (layout and printing), audio/visual, marketing, facilitation, & etc.; Coordinates and manages travel for select non-government participants such as travel, lodging, per diem, and reimbursements; and Assists with pre-event/meeting administrative needs (folders, packets, and briefing documents) as well as on-site logistics and management such as registration and other administrative activities for the event/meeting.

AMI supports HHS in leading the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) for developing materials and messages, managing a quarterly NVPO webinar, as well as creating a new award program for excellence in vaccines.

AMI has worked with HHS/NVPO to revitalize its approach to public information management support and incorporate it in all communication activities. Upon the contract award, AMI has leveraged its expertise in communication strategies, messaging, training, video production, internal and external communications, event and speaker management, and social media and engage with NVPO to conduct an audit of existing information materials and define goals and strategies for NVPO’ communication outreach. AMI ensures that the communication strategy does not only maximize the dissemination of best practices in food security but also echoes the relevant NVPO reform strategies.
Our strategy is to keep all materials fresh and updated so that we are prepared to provide information support whenever NVPO personnel requests assistance.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Senegal


2015 – 2018

AMI held the Senegal Blanket Purchase Agreement (BPA) contract to provide specialized services to USAID/Senegal. AMI worked with a team of highly experienced Senegalese and U.S. firms. Through the Senegal BPA, AMI provided USAID/Senegal with a diverse portfolio of tools and experts to conduct analyses and studies; manage activities; provide expert advice and services consistent with the goals set for the country.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Ethiopia


2015

Management Support and Technical Analysis Services (MSTAS) Project provides logistical and strategic analysis support to the USAID Africa Bureau Office of Sustainable Development Program in the following sectors: trade and economic growth, health, education, and democracy and governance.

AMI served as the strategic planning specialist for the Africa Center for Strategic Studies as it develops plans for a workshop on Countering Violent Extremist Messaging in the Horn of Africa. The Workshop was a six (6) day event held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia that examined violent extremist messages as well as mechanisms to counter their effectiveness in the greater Horn of Africa. It implemented best practices and lessons learned from previous workshops, building on the Near East and South Asia (NESA) Center for Strategic Studies, the Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) “Horn of Africa Region Destabilizing Factors and Transnational Threats,” and the ACSS’ Countering Violent Extremist (CVE) workshops.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Ethiopia


2014 – 2015

USAID Management Support and Technical Analysis Services (MSTAS) Project

Background: Management Support and Technical Analysis Services (MSTAS) Project provides logistical and strategic analysis support to the USAID Africa Bureau Office of Sustainable Development Program in the following sectors: trade and economic growth, health, education, and democracy and governance.

AMI served as the strategic planning specialist for the Africa Center for Strategic Studies as it develops plans for a workshop on Countering Violent Extremist Messaging in the Horn of Africa. The Workshop was a six (6) day event held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia that examined violent extremist messages as well as mechanisms to counter their effectiveness in the greater Horn of Africa. It implemented best practices and lessons learned from previous workshops, building on the Near East and South Asia (NESA) Center for Strategic Studies, the Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) “Horn of Africa Region Destabilizing Factors and Transnational Threats,” and the ACSS’ Countering Violent Extremist (CVE) workshops.

AMI provided the necessary planning and support to the Africa Bureau and the Africa Center for Strategic Studies. This planning and support consisted of the following specific duties:

  • Collect participant information (e.g., full names and variations of names, affiliations, and copies of passport).  Participants will be informed of the suitable travel dates keeping in mind that they should typically arrive at the destination in order to ensure they can be at the conference for 6 full days. In accordance with USAID travel policies.
  • Follow up regularly with USAID and ACSS points of contact to assist and resolve issues as necessary.
  • Communicate with participants, and provide information on flights, hotel, itinerary, and other necessary logistical details well before travel date.
  • Communicate with the hotel to ensure proper handling of payments and guest registration.
  • Communicate with the conference hotel and make payment for services provided to attendees (e.g., lunch and non-alcoholic drinks).
  • Advise participants on vaccination and other general health requirements for travel to Ethiopia, well in advance of travel date.  Reimburse for travel-related medical visits against medical bills/invoices. Follow up with participants to ensure they have obtained both the appropriate vaccination and the appropriate evidence of vaccination.
  • Make travel arrangements, including purchasing airplane tickets. Please note that some airlines in Africa do not have online booking systems, and travel may have to be arranged by in-country travel agents (separate agents for each participant’s country of origin).  This part of the process may occur by phone.  Payments will likely have to be made in different ways for each country.
  • Make per diem payments (cash advances via Western Union and/or bank transfers to the confirmed participants). One transfer for the full amount will be made before the conference.
  • Assist participants with visas, obtain visa facilitation letters as needed (for some countries, these may have to be an official invitation endorsed by a U.S. Government official). In some cases, a passport may need to be sent/couriered to a neighboring country to obtain a visa. Arrange and reimburse for visas (either advance visas or visas on arrival).
  • Provide participants with Emergency Medical Evacuation insurance policies for the duration of the Workshop and email insurance cards to participants in advance of travel.
  • Work with ACSS to determine the individual responsible for making hotel arrangements, room confirmations, and payment to the hotel.  Make payments directly to the hotel for participants in advance of travel.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Africa Bureau


2014 – 2015

USAID Management Support and Technical Analysis Services (MSTAS) Project

In 2014 Team AMI developed a strategic analysis under MSTAS designed to promote the establishment of linkages between bilateral and regional investment management funds/promotors and USAID-supported regional trade hub programs; for purposes of stimulating financial access for networks of SME’s supported under trade hub programs.  In addition over the first two years of its implementation, the project conducted several mid-term and final project evaluations, which included designing and conducting surveys of beneficiaries, interviews and focus groups. Recent work included final evaluations of USAID COMPETE in East Africa, and Youth-Map activities in Uganda and Senegal.

AMI completed the Evaluation of the African Diaspora Marketplace II business plan completion evaluation. The African diaspora is a deeply committed, yet largely untapped, source of innovative, entrepreneurial solutions to poverty and economic development in Africa. The African Diaspora Marketplace encourages sustainable economic growth and employment by supporting US-based African diaspora entrepreneurs with innovating and high-impact ideas for start-up and established businesses in sub-Saharan Africa.  The business plan competition awards prizes to fifteen to thirty winners with grants of as much as $50,000 and technical assistance grants worth $10,000-20,000.

PriceWaterhouse Coopers (PwC), our strategic partner is s the largest professional services firm in the world and possess great breadth and depth of diaspora resources for AMI. PwC brings together thousands of people all over the world possessing considerable collective expertise and sharing a single goal of enhancing client value. In 2013, PwC established an Africa Diaspora Project to bring the best talent back to the continent. In 2015, the Government of Mauritius embraced a package of incentives proposed by PwC which was announced in their National Budget Speech for the Mauritius Diaspora wishing to return to Mauritius.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Public Financial Management (PFM) IDIQ


2012 – Present

AMI is a Subcontractor to The Public Financial Management (PFM) Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ). This is a worldwide USAID contracting mechanism with the following objectives:

  • Empower USAID missions to engage in public financial management reforms and other economic policy and institutional reform/modernization projects;
  • Accumulate intellectual and technical resources to better understand, and thereby help overcome, economic policy and institutional constraints to economic growth; and
  • Advance state-of-the-art practices within the international donor community by making contributions to development theory and practice.

This IDIQ, with a ceiling of $700 million, provides PFM and other economic expertise that will: (1) Position USAID to provide sound development policy advice and be a lead player in fostering a better understanding of PFM issues and sectoral policy issues; and (2) Support USAID efforts to assist host countries in the design and implementation of large-scale economic and structural reform programs.

United States Trade and Development Agency (USTDA)


2011 – 2013

AMI and its partners completed a Definitional Mission (DM) in the Energy Sector for the U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA). The purpose of the DM was to determine which activities USTDA would invest in for Liberia’s energy sector. The beneficiary agency was Liberia Electricity Corporation. The work encompassed: 1) interviews with over 20 stakeholders across the energy sector, as well as government (Minister of Lands, Mines and Energy) and quasi-governmental organizations; 2) analyses of U.S. export potential, foreign competition, market entry issues and development impacts for Liberia, including human capacity building, technology transfer, sector and industry productivity improvements and market-oriented reforms; 3) examination of the impact on the Liberian environment as well as U.S. labor; 4) economic and financial analysis of the project; and 5) review of energy industry regulatory issues.

AMI investigated the infrastructure requirements that currently exist in the energy sector within Liberia. Further, we also reviewed the technology profile within the Liberian energy sector to facilitate Country’s participation in the West African Power Pool. One of the needs that this DM uncovered for Liberia’s energy industry is a creation of a well-functioning legal and regulatory regime for stakeholders.

AMI developed terms of reference and budgets for four projects for consideration by USTDA for feasibility studies. The tangible benefits of such definitional missions to determine funding for feasibility studies are to increase American exports and to improve the revenue possibilities for American firms who decide to invest and open operations in Liberia.

The project assessed the Liberian energy sector (post the civil war when its main power source from the Mount Coffee Hydro was destroyed) including power sources such as hydro, Diesel and Heavy Fuel options, mini and pico hydro, and the attendant costs to bring viable electricity to Liberia. Monrovia, the capital needs an estimated 40MW of which current supplies amount to less than half. In line with the Government of Liberia’s National Energy Policy to facilitate participation of the private sector, AMI looked at possible privatization scenarios including the following:
Management Contracting (MC)
Build, Own, and Operate (BOO)
Build, Operate, and Transfer (BOT)
Build, Own, Operate, and Transfer (BOOT)
AMI also developed the Terms of Reference for framework to encourage and build the enabling environment to induce more Independent Power Producers (IPPs).

Energy and infrastructure are very critical for economic development in developing economies.  They are even more critical especially for post-conflict countries as affordable energy can drive economic growth.   Thus to help accelerate economic growth, AMI works with governments to streamline their processes by modernizing energy sector policies, developing and enhancing policy and regulatory frameworks, and building capacity within various utilities and regulatory entities.  AMI works on the appropriate enabling environment, institutional strengthening, human and other resources to implement any changes to facilitate participation of the private sector in energy and infrastructure planning and development.

AMI evaluates energy sector and infrastructure policies to help governments develop cogent regulatory, policy, legal, and regulatory frameworks. This improves governance and performance and increases private sector participation and investment in energy and infrastructure.

Institutional Strengthening and Utility Management: We enhance the operational and commercial performance of public and private sector energy institutions, including electric power utilities as well as water and sewer authorities.

We assist in energy sector infrastructure project. We have tremendous specialized experience in rehabilitation of energy infrastructure in post-conflict and post-disaster countries.

Technical Assistance to Ownership is Change (OIC) International, a Non-Profit Organization, Philadelphia, PA


2010 – 2011

Under this new subcontract award, AMI assesses and reports on all food security issues, including changes in the food security situation and food aid requirements, Hill policies and actions affecting food aid programs, and donor pledges and programs; presents innovative designs of food security projects – lessons learned and best practices; drafts briefing reports, strategy papers, background documents, and work plans for priority issues in coordination with OIC staff; and, organizes OIC’s policy, media, constituency engagement, and policy staff buy-in and support for country strategies.

Department of Defense/Air Force -Global Engineering, Integration, and Technical Assistance (GEITA11)


2011 – Present

GLOBAL ENGINEERING, INTEGRATION, AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 2011 (GEITA11)

The scope of GEITA11 is to provide a full range of A&AS and deliverables in support of the AFCEC and their customers’ missions and may be performed in any location worldwide. Services and deliverables include three A&AS categories; Management and Professional Services; Studies,
Analyses, and Evaluations; and Engineering and Technical Expertise. More specifically, the contract
supports A&AS in the following Mission Areas:
• Environmental Restoration, Compliance, and Pollution Prevention
• Conservation and Planning
• Fuel Facility Engineering and Project Work
• Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) activities
• Air Force Real Property (AFRPA) activities
• Range Activity Support
• Military Family Housing (includes privatization and outsourcing)
• MILCON Program Support
• Homeland Defense Act activities/initiatives (Force Protection and Overseas Contingency Support)
• Operations and Maintenance Support
• Sustainability, Restoration and Modernization
• Strategic Planning
• Process Mapping
• Continuous Improvements
• Acquisition Support Services
• Expeditionary Engineering and Services
• Utilities
• Energy
• Infrastructure and Pavements
• Readiness
• Emergency Management

AMI deliverables include on-site installations, MAJCOMs and other AFCEE customers worldwide as required, deliverables to AFCEE internal operations to ensure quality assurance of its products and services.

Pre-Award Support/Post-Award Support. In assisting AFCEE to manage and oversee non-GEITA11 contracts, the contractor shall deliver documents defining TO requirements, developing and integrating execution strategies, Performance of Work Statements, Statements of Work (SOWs), programming documents, DD 1391s, cost estimates, and other components of the acquisition package. (CDRL A001)

Technical Interchange. AMI shall provide technical expertise to the Government at meetings worldwide.  AMI shall deliver technical presentations, provide agendas and meeting minutes, audiovisual equipment, facilitate meetings, etc.

Deliverable Review.  AMI shall perform and deliver technical reviews of data deliverables submitted by non-GEITA11 contractors.  Reviews shall assess functional and technical accuracy/completeness, and compliance with applicable regulations.  Deliverables shall state whether non-GEITA11 technical deliverables satisfy specifications and schedules and shall include written recommendations regarding acceptance or rejection of documents.  (CDRL A001)

Permit Applications. AMI shall assist the Air Force to obtain environmental and construction permits, applications, and compliance standards. AMI shall support the Air Force in negotiations with federal, state, and local permitting authorities.  (CDRL A001)

Litigation Support.  AMI shall advise and/or assist the Air Force during administrative and judicial proceedings involving other federal, state, local and public agencies.  AMI shall review, analyze, and make recommendations to integrate federal, state and local government comments on Air Force programs and studies.  AMI shall deliver documents to the Air Force in support of responses and/or reports to regulatory agencies.  (CDRL A001)

Project Tracking.  AMI shall maintain databases for specific project tracking.  AMI collects data and compiles it into files compatible with AFCEE standards.  (CDRL A001)

Documentation.  AMI assists in documenting program files, organizing files and providing administrative support, such as regulatory and partnering sessions at local or worldwide locations.  (CDRL A001)

Conference/Meeting Support.  AMI supports the Air Force at conferences and meetings.  This shall take the form of meeting setup, facilitation, as well as deliverables (graphics, study materials, invitations, record keeping, etc.)  Meetings/conferences may address a wide variety of topics, such as stakeholder involvement, community relations, risk communication, etc.

Technologies. AMI provides deliverables which evaluate commercially available and emerging technologies (e.g. remediation and hazardous materials treatment). Deliverables may include requirements to analyze experimental designs and provide recommendations concerning adoption of these designs and audit the performance of new technologies. Deliverables shall evaluate cost, performance, applicability of methods, development of initial methodologies and life cycle cost analysis.  (CDRL A001)

Master Schedule Support. AMI shall develop and update as necessary Master Schedules that integrate the individual Base Management Action Plan schedules and the technical and contracting schedules and resources.  Requirements may include baseline control of master schedules; identification of potential impacts; development of alternative courses of action, recommendations for balancing resources, schedule and program objectives and performing risk analyses to assess schedule viability based on realistic assessments of schedule risks; preparing alternatives to correct or avoid schedule variances, and performing analysis and review of engineering cost estimates; preparing program cost tracking, trend analysis and budget planning and programming.  (CDRL A001, A002, A003)

Base Management Action Plans.  AMI shall provide assistance and deliverables to develop and update Base Management Action Plans.  Requirements may include construction plans, community relation’s plans, housing market analyses, and housing community profiles.  (CDRL A001, A002)

Cost and Scheduling Support.  AMI shall provide deliverables which evaluate non-GEITA11 contractors’ performance.  Deliverables shall include cost and schedule analysis, project status reports, Estimates at Completion and provide cost performance improvement recommendations and alternative corrective measures to recover from schedule lapses and cost overruns.  Deliverable requirements may also include cost and schedule training and peer reviews of other analysts’ evaluations.  The contractor shall develop and provide engineering man-hour and cost estimates for project support.  (CDRL A001, A002, A003)

Training Support.  AMI shall provide training and/or deliverables in support of training to support the AFCEE mission worldwide.  (CDRL A001, A002, A003)

Acquisition/Execution SupportAMI shall provide Acquisition Support Services for all phases of the acquisition cycle to include development, award, management and measurement of contracting actions including contract closeout for non-GEITA11 contracts.  Requirements include, but are not limited to duties related to contract file management and documentation, Request for Proposal development, business analysis and recommendations, cost-price analysis, development of solutions and recommendations regarding contractual issues and preparation of final contract documents for signature by the CO.  The contractor shall support the pre-award and post-award contracting activities such as, but not limited to: Construction efforts, Architect-Engineering services, Information Management and Telecommunications, Research & Development support, Services support and Environmental Remediation/Restoration support in support of AFCEE and our customers.

 

 

 

 

Technical Assistance to the Corporate Council on Africa (CCA) a Non-Profit Organization, Washington, DC


2010 (Confidential)

AMI was retained by CCA to liaise with international agencies involved in emerging trade and export promotion. AMI undertook analytical activities required to determine the feasibility of opening an international small business center in DC. AMI provided senior and executive management consulting services decision makers and produced a proposal that was successfully funded.

Technical Assistance to the University of the District of Columbia (UDC), Washington DC


2010

This University funded project was designed to use analytical based tools and methods to review two-year business degrees and programs and to foster private sector demands for future graduates in international organizations such as the IMF, World Bank, etc. with the end result of generating economic growth and increasing employment options for graduates and strengthening existing programs. Specific project objectives included redefining trade and policy course curriculum to identify and respond effectively to industry needs.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Syria


2010

AMI assisted DCHA/CMM in organizing a successful workshop which focused on the ongoing conflict in Syria to inform USAID policy and planning. AMI assembled a team of three highly regarded Senior Experts with extensive knowledge of Syria and expertise in conflict resolution, political and economic reform, and civil society to speak at the conference and write framing papers for the conference attendees on different aspects of the Syrian situation. This team of experts was supported by a Senior Technical Expert/Moderator, Senior Administrative/Technical Expert, and Junior Administrative Expert. The workshop resulted in a final paper that summarized workshop findings and outlined recommendations to USAID and the U.S. Government on development assistance in a post-Assad regime era.
AMI provided comprehensive support for the entire planning and implementation process for the workshop. Logistical support included arranging for space rental, providing audio and visual equipment, catering for refreshments, printing workshop materials, and making travel arrangements for the speakers. AMI worked with the USAID COR and Activity Manager to assemble the list of invitees, send out invitations (maintaining a list of confirmed attendees on a SharePoint site), and create a workshop agenda.
To ensure that the time allotted for the workshop was well utilized and resulted in meaningful feedback from the attendees, AMI started working on the agenda as soon as the contract was awarded. By taking time to develop a detailed agenda we ensured that the workshop ran to schedule and achieved its stated objectives. AMI worked to set and follow a clear discussion format, determining which format was most appropriate to achieve the objective of the workshop. In making this determination we considered the number of participants, the nature of the topics under discussion, and the available time. AMI coordinated with the COR and Activity Manager to finalize the agenda and make sure it met DCHA/CMM learning and programmatic objectives. The end result was a realistic agenda with clear roles for each participant that greatly contributed to a constructive discussion and generated valuable feedback from the attendees.
AMI designed and planned the workshop activities, selecting the tools that were most appropriate for a successful outcome. Our Moderator guided and controlled workshop activities to ensure that there was effective participation, participants achieved a mutual understanding, and their contributions were considered and included in the final paper summarizing the outcome of the workshop. AMI facilitated a constructive, goal-oriented discussion during the workshop.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Africa Bureau


2009

AMI managed the Africa Bureau’s Global Food Security Response (GFSR) $25 million of supplemental funding for the West Africa regional program. With a substantial increase in resources and a new administration strategy to promote global food security, AMI led the AFR/SD/EGEA team in organizing GFSR data and information and translating this information into practical policy applications. He led the team through GFSR planning and reporting exercises, and made recommendations for solutions to senior decision-makers in AFR’s front office.
AMI initiated and chaired regular meetings to prioritize tasks, clarify roles, and boost morale throughout an OIG audit. He collaborated with other USG agencies and contractors to assist in developing four technical workshops that addressed specific OIG issues.
AMI managed and coordinated the master schedule of events and milestones for the annual African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) Forum. AMI also, while serving on interagency committees, made key contributions to the Regional Trade Integration and the Staple Food Markets and Trade Systems group’s technical content. AMI’s work resulted in improved timeliness, quantity and quality of communications by bringing desk officers and mission program officers together and clarifying roles.
AMI had responsibility for a $25 million portfolio and wrote an innovative strategic link between the agriculture and non-agriculture activities, and engaged in the implementation of the new economic growth (EG) and poverty reduction (PR) strategic framework for the mission’s new Country Assistance Strategy (CAS). The CAS forges alliances and leverages resources to further the goal of regional integration in East Africa, harmonizing a bureau-wide approach to regional integration with neighboring missions. AMI’s efforts led to the design of a program that incorporated greater economic growth resources, technical assistance and results reporting to ensure maximum program impact. Senior Ethiopia Mission leadership stated that he was an effective team leader, mastering the mission’s extensive trade and investment portfolio and making timely decisions on program resource levels and grant management.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Iraq


2008

AMI focus moved to strengthening the effectiveness of government and civil society organizations (CSO) in Iraq, expanding private sector opportunities, and supporting focused stabilization activities. These types of activities continued until 2009 when USG assistance began shifting from reconstruction to building Iraq’s capacity to reconstruct and govern itself effectively.
AMI managed the $269 million alternative livelihood program in Eastern Baghdad, Iraq. They helped shape the strategic environment and planning process in unifying development and governance and civil society efforts. Their technical work to civil society and community development cut across all sectors of AMI’s work included mainstreaming citizen engagement in improving access to economic opportunities, health, education, infrastructure, social resources, and services. AMI built partnerships among actors and organizations at the community level, local governments, and the private sector. AMI:
a. Promoted local economic and social development;
b. Encouraged participation of women and youth in civil society;
c. Developed and promoted civil society networks; and,
d. Fostered direct linkages and input from local communities to local government.

Specifically, AMI provided technical assistance by fostering joint USAID – U.S. military for the planning and implementation of the revitalization of the “9” Nissan district market, one of the foremost U.S. objectives to help the Iraqis build sustainable enterprises. AMI consulted with a wide range of counterparts and stakeholders to identify gaps and opportunities and undertook a series of constructive steps to significantly strengthen the performance and administration of USAID development programs. AMI was instrumental in managing this highly visible project by ensuring that milestones and targets were met between military-civil affairs and US – Funded contractors. AMI advised senior level military personnel by coordinating the civil-affairs team and the agricultural market team: mentoring military counterparts on USAID businesses and how USAID could support Embedded Provisional Reconstruction Teams (EPRT-2) operations; connecting military specialists with appropriate Mission technical officers, and then following up in a way that achieved both organizations’ goals. A senior USG official stated that “there are many improved methods and approaches to how this Command operates with respect to development that have come in no small measure to AMI’s extensive involvement throughout the Command in coaching, teaching and mentoring.” AID/W, Administrator Fore requested a briefing from AMI on the status of the EPRTs – a testament to AMI’s contributions to this important effort.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)


2008

AMI prepared the briefing and decision documents for the Sixth Annual WTO Ministerial Conference in Hong Kong, attended by over 100 senior-level officials from Africa. Mr. Simmons represented the Africa Bureau and team by organizing the event and making substantial comments and suggestions, in a series of virtual meetings that were organized around the event. In coordination with the Africa Bureau, he conceptualized the development of comprehensive yet lean briefings and decision packages that consisted of essential and substantive one-page summaries of economic issues and events in the sub-Saharan African countries; US and European Union (EU) trade data; success stories; USAID individual country budgets; and more. The meetings were successful, and made substantive contributions to the success at the meetings with the African trade ministers. In addition, Mr. Simmons served as the lead trade delegate for the Global Competitiveness Hub workshop in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. He facilitated and managed this workshop, attended by over 150 participants, in a highly effective manner, and provided his expertise in development aid to speakers and participants.

Furthermore, AMI managed and coordinated USAID professional staff in formulating policy and strategy, drafting speeches and talking points, and developing technical assistance programs supporting U.S. Government international economic policy for World Trade Organization Ministerial meetings, annual G-8 meetings of heads of state, and international donor meetings focused on promoting growth in developing countries.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Tanzania


2008

AMI served as the team leader/Senior DG Adviser in support of the First Lady of Tanzania’s local NGO. AMI evaluated, and accessed local health providers, income generation projects, women empowerment NGOs and Civil Society Tanzanian firms and authored a 50 page report of recommendations required for new program activities which included benchmarks, gaps and performance targets. The main goal of the organization is to improve the life standards of women, girls and other vulnerable children through promoting access to education, health service: adolescent and sexual reproductive, maternal and infant, and capacity building for economic empowerment.
AMI accomplished its objectives of the program by carrying out the following activities:
To promote access to quality post primary education to girl child from poor and most at risk families by addressing strategic inhibiting factors; to promote access to health and specifically sexual reproductive health services to women and girl child with a view to ensure gains made in girl child education; and, to empower economically women from poor and most at risk families (targeting women-mothers/guardians of supported girl children) with a view to make them active and effective contributors to empowerment of girls.
AMI’s teamwork and professionalism resulted in the effective balancing of the interests of multiple parties in a complex collaborative effort to reach common goals and objectives. Throughout this effort AMI showcased its technical and analytical skills and conveyed an understanding and commitment of both USAID’s polices and core values and fundamental development principles through broad participation and inclusiveness. According to the USAID/Tanzania Mission Director, Pam White, “AMI worked under a very tight deadline…and showed an excellent grasp of how to produce results within a cross-cultural setting and to get the best out of a group of people.” AMI’s ability to work effectively in an overseas environment secured the approval of stakeholders and the foundation’s board of directors and resulted in the exceptionally high quality of the strategic heath plan, as well as a letter of appreciation from the First Lady of Tanzania. According to senior USG officials, AMI’s superb job in developing a Strategic Plan for local NGOs ultimately strengthened U.S. relations with the Tanzanian government. AMI transferred cutting edge technical knowledge and tools to USAID Field Mission staff; including in such crucial program/project design and evaluation tools such as Cost/Benefit Analysis; Policy Matrix Analysis, Growth Diagnostics analysis; and Operational and Sustainability Analysis for NGOs. In addition, he organized advocacy activities for expansion of HIV testing services, supported basic family planning through advocacy and education on obstetric services to help reduce maternal deaths, and vastly strengthened the capacity of targeted NGOs consisting of the youth, women, CSO and NGOs

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)


2008

AMI coordinated the successful implementation of the Mission/Agency-wide DG Fundamentals workshop and provided a constructive evaluation process for improving DG training. This included collaboration with office divisions on developing a schedule, curriculum and teaching materials; as well as completion of a final evaluation report. In this activity AMI supervised an institutional contractor, providing regular performance feedback and guidance. AMI also designed the evaluation questionnaire, analyzed the findings, and presented his recommendations for improving future workshops, leading monitoring and evaluating activities throughout the workshop implementation process. AMI’s work contributed to helping DCHA/DG achieve the Agency and Office vision of a leading learning organization.
AMI also provided management support to the DCHA/DG Program Team for overall DG Office program oversight and staffing support, and assumed management responsibility for world learning and the Cooperative Administrative Support Unit (CASU) Agreement. AMI reviewed and monitored the plans and activities of DG grantees and contractors, and ensured coordination of DG programs. He negotiated and communicated with the contracting office to implement program and policy direction to ensure the seamless functioning of DG office personnel. AMI assessed the status of Democracy Fellows and reported on all coordination activities including the effectiveness of each Fellow’s duties. AMI’s analysis and organizational ability helped to ensure the orderly and seamless functioning of the DG office.
As a key member of the DG program team, AMI utilized interest-based negotiation skills and demonstrated an active pursuit of knowledge to achieve broader expertise.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) DCHA


2007

AMI led the review process of three new pastoralist safety –net pilot proposals for Ethiopia, coordinating input from stakeholders in the field and USAID/W.

AMI successfully played important roles related to managing significant resources at FFP. AMI organized and completed the review of several Ethiopia pilot pastoral food aid safety net proposals valued at $12 million. Effectively using program expertise, AMI took the lead and organized a review team that provided useful input from stakeholders in the field and in Washington. In Kabul, AMI provided technical coverage as part of the Mission’s team, managing the $269 million agriculture and alternative livelihood efforts. “ AMI took a leadership role in coordinating with our outreach office, prepared time-sensitive scene setters, schedules and related tasks to ensure that the first Agriculture Fair was a success.
AMI demonstrated strong leadership skills in the achievement of USAID’s vision and strategic plans. AMI led a series of analytical discussions with the military/civil affairs team to help identify, and prioritize the development issues/challenges in Istiqal so that the team could better and more effectively operationalize their development decisions, as well as weigh alternatives.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Africa Bureau


2006 – 2007

AMI oversaw all aspects of the negotiation and award of evaluation contract with to develop a scope of work for an evaluation of technical assistance under the AGOA Presidential Initiative.

Researched and secured Contractor to implement the evaluation of New scope of work Under the Trade for African Development and Enterprise initiative, in East, Central, and Sub-Saharan Africa Global Trade Competitiveness Hub drafted.

Oversas all aspects of the negotiation and implementing changes to the consolidated PASA agreement and incorporated recommendations to new SOW/contract.

Other Contributions

• Initiative to End Hunger in Africa (IEHA) The Presidential Initiative to End Hunger in Africa (IEHA) is a multi-year effort designed to help increase agricultural income and fulfill the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goal of cutting the number of hungry people in Africa in half by 2015. This initiative focuses on promoting agricultural growth and building an African-led partnership to cut hunger and poverty by investing in agriculture oriented towards toward small-scale farmers. AMI met with senior agriculture officials and colleagues to understand the intricacies of IEHA, and took the initiative to prepare a budget for the Evaluation of Implementation of the presidential Initiative to End Hunger in Africa (IEHA).

• AMI prepared and submitted a briefer to the Africa Bureau AA for the Sixth Annual Word Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference for AFR/SD. Provided a series of one-page issue summaries of Sub-Saharan countries and information on trade, USAID budgets and specific activities for meetings with trade ministers

• AMI provided input into SOW for economic growth strategy for Agency. I participated in discussions designed to shape the Agency’s future strategy toward economic growth which will help increase the number of economic growth officers in the field.

• AMI prepared and managed the preparation of briefers, success stories, talking points, Congressional Staff notes, and AGCI organizational diagrams for the front office and interagency meetings. And participated in interagency AGCI and AGOA plenary meetings. AMI reviewed and commented on AGCI draft Framework.

• AMI participated in the East and Central Africa Regional AGOA Sectoral Working Group and represented the Africa bureau in the AGOA Workshop in Addis Abba, Ethiopia in October, 2005, identified American and European buyers and traders to participate in the AGOA forum.

• AMI represented the Africa Bureau in the Africa Expo in Atlanta, Georgia and met with African importers and referred them to the AGOA workshop in Addis, Abba.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Central Asia Region (CAR)


2003 – 2005

AMI was the manager for the highly impactful USAID-funded Enterprise Development Project (EDP) in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. EDP delivered technical support to MSMEs through 12 sustainable Enterprise Development Centers. The project worked with 150 associations of entrepreneurs and farmers, chambers of commerce, consumer rights protection groups, and other NGOs. The project focused on developing local capacity to drive sustainable enhancement of agriculture productivity, financial management, and value chain linkages for MSMEs. The regional trade promotion worked intensively with SME clients in locating new markets, suppliers, and buyers and brought potential trade partners together via dissemination of strategic market identification knowledge and related development of strategic market contacts.

The project implemented major locally driven advocacy/outreach efforts to promote critical enabling environment reforms for MSMEs. In addition to targeted external and (primarily) local consulting expertise on key policy/institutional reform issues, AMI developed an innovative incentive-based grant program to build local capacity to articulate and lobby cohesively for MSME-related enabling environment reforms. Grants aimed to (1) expand the range of membership dues and non-dues payments and develop relevant/high impact services for association members; (2) eliminate policy/institutional constraints hindering market integration/value chain development; (3) promote cross-border industry expansion, sponsor cross-border business cooperation, and increase participation in trade fairs/ exhibitions; and (4) remove business and property registration and transactional constraints limiting MSME growth.

The projected supported over 150 business associations through grants and strategic consulting services; and assisted 40 clients in achieving ISO-9001:2000 certification, and 55 clients in passing pre-certification audits. In the policy reform area, the projected assisted with the removal of 114 policy/legal constraints to MSME formation and market access through high-impact technical analysis and related outreach support activities (largely provided through local associative institutions); these included major policy/regulatory reforms in business registration/licensing, property registration, construction permitting, and social insurance payment areas.